How Dogs Changed Us and How We Changed Them

Dogs are really a big deal nowadays. I remember as a kid seeing dogs tied outdoors with ramshackle dog houses. I always felt bad for dogs left to their own devices except for a few minutes of human interaction during feeding every day. It was wrong for people to do that. Now there are laws prohibiting that kind of treatment.

Nowadays we even have premium dog foods, such as Natures Domain Salmon, to feed our dogs. I remember when there was just plain old canned and dry dog food. Not long before that dogs ate the scraps their people would give them. The history of how dogs moved into our homes and fueled a multi-billion dollar pet product line is an interesting one. No other animal species is as close to us as dogs are.

I know that cat owners would disagree, but the natural temperament of the bulk of domesticated dogs puts them even closer to us than cats. We all know that cats can be extremely friendly and enjoy human companionship. However, cats are largely nocturnal, and they cannot herd animals and do things like rescue and police work. They cannot be trained to detect landmines or armed insurgents and other things dogs excel at learning.

Dogs are the only non-human species that has integrated with human beings on a large scale to work with us, be companions, be protectors and more. They are like family. We treat them like they are our children. We feed them premium foods, and they even share our beds.

Laws are changing to protect them with many areas not permitting keeping dogs outdoors. I know that sled dogs in Alaska are bred for cold climate survival, and they are kept in outdoor areas with doghouse kinds of shelters. However, your average neighborhood dog in the lower forty-eight states needs laws protecting them from owner abuse, and they deserve premium dog food and treats to keep them fed well and healthy.